Symbolic Energy in Bodies of Water By Lauren Luquin

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Words By Lauren Luquin
Photography By Chloe Garcia Ponce

For a few moments, think of yourself as an energy system. All living things have a field of energy interwoven as a part of and surrounding them… Itʼs called an aura. An aura is made up of various types of energies and frequencies including light and sound as well as magnetic, electric, and thermal energies. Energy systems of living beings are effected by various factors, just like the energy systems of natural landscapes and habitats are as well. We can look to nature to see our reflection in the way our activities influence our energy system and how all energy systems affect each other. We are constantly giving off and absorbing energy with other humans, animals, plants, and the earth itself. For example, a sunny parched desert environment carries a different energy than a murky dark swamp habitat, and while both contain a vibration we can resonate with, there will be ways to differentiate between how we feel or interpret our experience within various places. By immersing ourself into different environmental landscapes we notice how they activate different energies within us. There are so many lessons to be learned from the way our energy system is affected and influences other energy systems. One somewhat obvious and extremely important aspect of life here on earth is the energy of water. Our physical bodies are literally made up of mostly water, and water sustains life on this planet. Water carries energy that flows through this earth like life blood. Even so, in the most barren deserts the lack of water has a role to play and reminds us of the unseen abundance, and the need for extreme resourcefulness. When we look at the water in natural landscapes, environments and energy systems of the living beings within them, we can see patterns and use symbology to extract messages to help us awaken, and harness the gifts available to us by recognizing water as part of different energy systems. Consider that water is a dynamic sacred substance taking on so many forms, always shifting and changing like us, and then contemplate the way you feel when you are in your most favorite relaxing place as opposed to a stressful environment you have had to suffer through… You know your vibrations are going out into the universe, and your actions are affected by the stimuli affecting you from all directions no matter what you are feeling. Water is the same way. It not only soaks up the sun, it freezes and thaws, can rush or stay stagnant, it collects murky pollution and can be cleansed and bring flourishing nourishment to many… We are very similar to water. That is why we should bring awareness to our relation to water, and not just the fact that we must drink it to survive, but to live in a way that recognizes that water and humans are mirroring each other and the reflections we make in our awareness ripple out and cause energy to awaken in others.

Water settles and flows, it holds energy within in it, and is a powerful catalyst. Think about the ponds, lakes, rivers, streams, ocean, wetlands, marshes, swamps, hot springs, and fresh water springs in your area or those youʼve visited. Each one of these habitats is a vital part of the surrounding area, and they all contain a powerful energy system containing water, that affects us and is affected by us. There is no separation. To best serve the earth as stewards of the land, water and all energy systems it helps to know how to access the spiritual doorways within ourselves and in nature. The healing process of our own aura is intertwined with the energy fields of the habitats we live in and journey to. Lakes hold and contain, they have depth and can draw us inward… Oceans are vast and powerful, life-giving and they ebb and flow with the moon… Rivers flow and pass over, through and around whatever stands in its way, they travel long distances and hold memories of ancient pathways… Streams remind us to listen as they allow us to get down low and observe, go slower, and we lose some of the fear that larger stronger bodies of water bring out in us, they carry messages from the rivers and serve many without much recognition. There are so many ways of looking at bodies of water symbolically. Allow your mind to open in a meditative state while you tap into to a place or situation containing water… what ideas come to mind? Maybe the significance in the symbolism of what water you are drawn to is a reflection of something you are opening up to in yourself, in your life, or that you are being called to acknowledge by the universe. Even if you live in a suburban city environment and have little access to nature or fresh water, you can make connections, and in fact it is much more critical for you to do so, by getting creative with the ways you can bring nature into your home or yard. Often, the lessons learned in city landscapes are about living in community, being adaptable, and flexible, and similarly but in different intensities, we have the same lessons in all places rural or densely populated! Especially now (in many areas) concerns about fresh water are on the rise. The impact of water in our life is possibly the most important survival necessity, and organized efforts must be made on a personal and macro level to better manage, save, and use water efficiently. Water has a life of its own.

Water symbolizes birth, death and creativity. It represents the emotions, dreamtime, astral travel, intuition, and fluid inspiration. Through water we access much healing, and heighten our psychic awareness and all powers expand. What water landscapes are you familiar with or drawn to? What distinct characteristics of these water realms spark your interest, or concern you? When we start to see water as not only a part of ourself, but as an element, source of life, and part of the grander energy systems that holds the potential for us to learn from and help maintain life for the benefit of all, we awaken to a more evolved understanding of our life and all life on this planet. If you were sitting on an ocean shore what types of things might you see and experience? If you look closely you would see so many interdependent factors contributing to the wellness of the area. You may also notice things that influence it in ways that inhibit or disturb the wellness, like trash, pollution, or erosion. All of these things affect the overall energy system of the area, and likewise affect our experience.
Our experience can be felt by others, and itʼs a spiraling cycle that pulses outwardly and inwardly… it is powerful. If we take a holistic approach to doing our own inner work and healing, we are more able to do the same type of work for the earth. We must see the energy systems as they are. Constantly changing, vulnerable, influenced by many seen and unseen factors, and most importantly, interdependent upon all other energy systems. Studying water as part of various energy systems (including our own) is teaching us about how to nourish ourselves, how to journey to the depths of possibility, how to flow with nature and yield to the earth with respect, how to open to healing by coming back into balance, how to awaken and replenish our mind, body, and spirit how to purify ourselves, and hold sacred the rains that fall and collect. Be grateful for water and all of the ways it is stimulating awareness and new growth within our consciousness. We are in the process of gaining much clarity about our dependency on water. Water contains the essence of great mystery and power.

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Amphitheatre - water postSian Ka'an - water postRio de JanieroScreen Shot 2015-08-25 at 8.10.25 PMMinnewaska - water postVela de NoviaScreen Shot 2015-08-25 at 8.04.28 PMThe NileScreen Shot 2015-08-26 at 8.41.52 AM

Images from top to bottom, linked to Nomadic Songlines for further details.

Las Coloradas, Yucatan, Mecxico
Jökulsárlón Glacial River Lagoon, South East Iceland
Amphitheatre , Hierve el Agua in Lorenzo Albarradas, Mexico
Sian Ka’an in Quintana Roo, Mexico
Rio de Janiero, Brazil
Stori Geysir, Haukadalur Valley, Iceland
Lake Minnewaska, Minnewaska State Park Preserve in Kerhonkson, New York, USA
Vela de Novia, Cascade of el Chiflon Waterfalls at the National Park in Chiapas, Mexico
Bacalar lagoon, Tulum, Mexico
The Nile, Egypt
Cala Coticcio, Caprera, Sardinia

 

 

Stòri Geysir


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